Can owning a pet improve your social life?

Can owning a pet improve your social life?

As well as providing lots of enjoyment and affection, acquiring a pet, especially a dog, can also help you keep in good health both physically and mentally. Most pet parents will tell you that they love their pet like a member of the family, but owning a pet can have other benefits for the members of your household too. There have been many studies that conclude pet ownership is good for your health in ways of exercise, boosting immunity and stress and depression reduction.  But a recent study by Harvard University, University of Western Australia and Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition (UK) found that pets can also help build social relationships and support networks. Overall, the study found that pet owners are significantly more likely to meet new people in their neighbourhoods than non-pet owners. Around a quarter of those who met people through their pet said that this resulted in at least one new friendship rather than a mere acquaintance. Dog owners fare even better as they are five times more likely to get to know people in their neighbourhoods compared with other pet owners, with dog walking being one of the top five ways for people to meet new people. Read more at Man’s Best Friend Helps Owners Build New Friendships and Pets can help their humans create friendships, find social support   How many friends has your pet introduced you...
Don’t Let Your Kitten Become An Underage Mother

Don’t Let Your Kitten Become An Underage Mother

Lots of kittens are given as Christmas presents every year, but did you know that a cuddly little kittie acquired just last Christmas may have already reached sexual maturity? International Cat Care explains the issues and urges a proactive approach before it is too late: From around the age of 5 to 8 months, kittens reach sexual maturity and are therefore capable of breeding and producing kittens themselves. Accidental litters can lead to a huge increase in feline population size, which often leaves many kittens homeless or left in rescue centres and animal shelters. Neutering a cat – castration in the male (removal of the testes), and spaying the female (removal of the ovaries and uterus) – not only prevents unwanted pregnancies occurring and keeps the feline population size under control, but also curbs unwanted behavioural patterns associated with sexual maturity and reduces the risk of certain diseases.   They have has some excellent advice about why you should neuter your cat, covering both females and males on their website where you can read the full details: Neutering your cat If you haven’t had your kitten neutered yet, we strongly recommend a visit to...

Spring Specials - Don't Miss a Hot Bargain on Sale TODAY! Dismiss